The Countryside Code

A new Countryside Code has been launched by Natural England and Natural Resources Wales to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the creation of the founding booklet published in 1951. The update is the first in over a decade and includes advice on creating a welcoming environment, clearer rules to underline the importance of clearing away dog poo, staying on footpaths and not feeding livestock.

Key changes to the Countryside Code are as follows:

  • New advice for people to ‘be nice, say hello, share the space’ as well as ‘enjoy your visit, have fun, make a memory’.
  • A reminder not to feed livestock, horses or wild animals.
  • To stay on marked footpaths, even if they are muddy, to protect crops and wildlife.
  • Information on permissions to do certain outdoor activities, such as wild swimming.
  • Clearer rules for dog walkers to take home dog poo and use their own bin if a there are no public waste bins.
  • A refreshed tone of voice, creating a guide for the public rather than a list of rules, recognising the significant health and wellbeing benefits of spending time in nature.
  • New wording to make clear that the code applies to all our natural places, including parks and waterways, coast and countryside.
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St Mary’s Church, Over Silton, North York Moors

The medieval church of St Mary Magdalene is situated on the south-east side of Over Silton in North Yorkshire. It can only be reached on foot by walking across a grassy field, from either the village or Kirk Ings Lane, a minor road just to the south.

The Osmotherley and Kepwick walk in the North York Moors includes a visit to the ancient church, a look at the lovely villages of Kepwick, Nether Silton and Over Silton and an excellent high-level trek across Black Hambleton on the Cleveland Way.

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Three fabulous walks in Swaledale

Have a look at these circular trails in Swaledale, in the northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. They are all between 9 and 10 miles long and will take 4½ to 5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Gunnerside, Gunnerside Gill, Healaugh, Reeth, Langthwaite and Arkengarthdale.

The northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these fabulous Swaledale routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the Yorkshire Dales Northern & Central Area, reference OS Explorer OL30, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Three excellent walks in Lower Wensleydale

Have a look at these circular trails in Lower Wensleydale, in or just outside the northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. They are all about 10 miles long and will take approximately 5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Carlton, West Burton, West Witton, Leyburn and Aysgarth Falls.

The northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these fabulous Lower Wensleydale routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the Yorkshire Dales Northern & Central Area, reference OS Explorer OL30, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five of the best walks in the Yorkshire Dales

Take a look at these circular trails in the northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. They are all between 7 and 9 miles long and will take 3½ to 4½ hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Reeth, Langthwaite, Muker, Buckden, Yockenthwaite, Hubberholme, Aysgarth Falls, Crackpot Hall and the Swinner Gill Lead Mines.

The northern and central area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these superb Yorkshire Dales routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the Yorkshire Dales Northern & Central Area, reference OS Explorer OL30, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five amazing walks in the Yorkshire Dales

Check out these circular trails in the southern and western area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. They are all between 8 and 10 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Bolton Abbey, Simon’s Seat, The Strid, Trollers Gill, Gordale Scar, Janet’s Foss, Malham Cove, Ingleborough and Stainforth Force.

The southern and western area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these superb Yorkshire Dales routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the Yorkshire Dales Southern & Western Area, reference OS Explorer OL2, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five fantastic walks in the North York Moors

Check out these circular trails in the eastern area of the North York Moors National Park. They are all between 9 and 11 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Whisper Dales, Dalby Forest, Bridestones Nature Reserve, Falling Foss, Grosmont and Goathland.

The eastern area of the North York Moors National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these superb North York Moors routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the North York Moors Eastern Area, reference OS Explorer OL27, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five of the best walks in the North York Moors

Check out these circular trails in the western area of the North York Moors National Park. They are all between 10 and 12 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as the Esk Valley, Farndale, Rosedale Abbey and Hutton-le-Hole.

The western area of the North York Moors National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these classic North York Moors routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the North York Moors Western Area, reference OS Explorer OL26, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Flamborough Head Tower, Yorkshire Coast

The famous chalk tower at Flamborough Head was built in 1674 as a lighthouse by Sir John Clayton and partner George Blake who were granted additional patents from Charles II to build lighthouses at Farne Islands, Cromer, Lowestoft and Portland Bill.

Constructed of brilliant white chalk, the tower was a visible beacon from afar, both at sea and on land. It was as a signalling point that the tower was particularly useful.

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Freebrough Hill, Guisborough, North York Moors

Standing prominently above the surrounding countryside, Freebrough Hill is an enigmatic landmark visible from the A171 Guisborough to Whitby route. It lies on the south side of the road between Lockwood Beck Reservoir and Scaling Reservoir.

There has been much speculation in the past as to how this hill came to possess its distinctive rounded profile. John Walker Ord, in his book The History and Antiquities of Cleveland, published in 1846, says the hill was thought to be a great burial mound for no less than the legendary King Arthur and his Knights, the idea originating from poet J.H. Stephenson’s verse:

Freebro’s huge mount, immortal Arthur’s tomb

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