Five amazing walks in the Yorkshire Dales

Check out these circular trails in the southern and western area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. They are all between 8 and 10 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Bolton Abbey, Simon’s Seat, The Strid, Trollers Gill, Gordale Scar, Janet’s Foss, Malham Cove, Ingleborough and Stainforth Force.

The southern and western area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these superb Yorkshire Dales routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the Yorkshire Dales Southern & Western Area, reference OS Explorer OL2, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five fantastic walks in the North York Moors

Check out these circular trails in the eastern area of the North York Moors National Park. They are all between 9 and 11 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as Whisper Dales, Dalby Forest, Bridestones Nature Reserve, Falling Foss, Grosmont and Goathland.

The eastern area of the North York Moors National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these superb North York Moors routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the North York Moors Eastern Area, reference OS Explorer OL27, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Five of the best walks in the North York Moors

Check out these circular trails in the western area of the North York Moors National Park. They are all between 10 and 12 miles long and will take 4-5 hours to complete. The walks include visits to some of the region’s most beautiful places such as the Esk Valley, Farndale, Rosedale Abbey and Hutton-le-Hole.

The western area of the North York Moors National Park

One Ordnance Survey map covers these classic North York Moors routes

The best map to use is the Ordnance Survey map of the North York Moors Western Area, reference OS Explorer OL26, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Flamborough Head Tower, Yorkshire Coast

The famous chalk tower at Flamborough Head was built in 1674 as a lighthouse by Sir John Clayton and partner George Blake who were granted additional patents from Charles II to build lighthouses at Farne Islands, Cromer, Lowestoft and Portland Bill.

Constructed of brilliant white chalk, the tower was a visible beacon from afar, both at sea and on land. It was as a signalling point that the tower was particularly useful.

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Freebrough Hill, Guisborough, North York Moors

Standing prominently above the surrounding countryside, Freebrough Hill is an enigmatic landmark visible from the A171 Guisborough to Whitby route. It lies on the south side of the road between Lockwood Beck Reservoir and Scaling Reservoir.

There has been much speculation in the past as to how this hill came to possess its distinctive rounded profile. John Walker Ord, in his book The History and Antiquities of Cleveland, published in 1846, says the hill was thought to be a great burial mound for no less than the legendary King Arthur and his Knights, the idea originating from poet J.H. Stephenson’s verse:

Freebro’s huge mount, immortal Arthur’s tomb

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Grosmont Railway Tunnels, North York Moors

The North York Moors village of Grosmont lies on the Whitby to Pickering railway line, which was built by George Stephenson and opened over its full length on 26 May 1836. There are two adjacent railway tunnels to the south of the village, and the current line passes through the large one.

The earlier small tunnel is now used as a pedestrian route through to the North York Moors Railway engine sheds. Built between 1833 and 1835, it is a Grade 2 listed building, 130 yards long, 14 feet high and 10 feet wide. It was one of the world’s first passenger railway tunnels and carriages containing up to 10 people would have been pulled by horses.

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Pillars Past, Pateley Bridge, Nidderdale

The sculpture ‘Pillars Past’ is just a couple of minutes walk from Pateley Bridge town centre. It can be found by following the Six Dales Trail towards Glasshouses alongside the River Nidd. Commissioned by Sustrans, it forms part of the public art trail ‘Passing Places’ which mirrors the long distance Way Of The Roses Cycle Route.

This coast-to-coast route between Morecambe and Bridlington passes through some of the most beautiful landscape in the north of England, and ‘Passing Places’ was developed as a public art project with the aim of adding a cultural and historic experience to enrich the travellers’ journey. Pateley Bridge, sited half way along the route, was selected as the location for one of the pieces of public art.

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Easby Abbey, Richmond, Northern England

Easby Abbey was known in the Middle Ages as the Abbey of St Agatha by Richmond. It was founded in 1151-2 by Roald, constable of nearby Richmond Castle.

Easby was a house of Premonstratensian canons, the third house of this order to be founded in England. They were an order of regular canons, meaning communities of ordained priests living together, rather than monks – who take vows but are not ordained.

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