The Ambleside and Loughrigg Fell walk in the Lake District

West from Ambleside to the summit of Loughrigg Fell via Miller Brow and Black Mire. Generally north-east and downhill to Rydal Cave on the site of a former slate quarry, then west by way of Loughrigg Terrace to meet the minor road on Red Bank. South-east to Loughrigg Tarn and east along a track which skirts the base of Loughrigg Fell’s Ivy Crag. Further east back to Miller Brow before returning to Ambleside through Rothay Park. An 8-mile walk in the Lake District.


The best map to use on this walk is the Ordnance Survey map of the Lake District South-Eastern Area, reference OS Explorer OL7, scale 1:25,000. It clearly displays footpaths, rights of way, open access land and vegetation on the ground, making it ideal for walking, running and hiking. The map can be purchased from Amazon in either a standard, paper version or a weatherproof, laminated version, as shown below.

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Looking down upon Loughrigg Tarn from the path between Black Mire and the Loughrigg Fell summit.


The view south-west towards Elter Water from Loughrigg Fell’s Lad Crag. Lingmoor Fell is to the right of the lake and Wetherlam is in the background.


Windermere as seen from the Loughrigg Fell summit.


Looking over towards Elterwater (the village) and Great Langdale.


Kevin and I at the triangulation pillar on Loughrigg Fell summit, height 335 metres (1099 feet).


One of the paths off Loughrigg Fell on the east side of Ewe Crag. The lake at the bottom is Rydal Water, home to Heron Island (left) and Little Isle (right).


The mountain behind Rydal Water is Heron Pike, and the two high points on the ridge to the right are Low Pike and High Pike. Together they form part of the ‘Fairfield Horseshoe’ loop. To the far right in the distance is Red Screes.


The sun’s rays break through the clouds and light up Low Pike.


Rydal Cave

A man-made cave on the site of a former slate quarry, with stepping stones leading to a partially dry interior.

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Whilst writing about Loughrigg Fell, Alfred Wainwright commented on Rydal Cave as follows:

A detour should certainly be made to Loughrigg Quarries, the big upper cave being quite a surprise; there is shelter enough here for the whole population of Ambleside (although, admittedly, many people would be standing in water).


Two of several small slate statues built near the Rydal Cave entrance. Kevin gets a picture from an unusual angle.


The sun illuminates Helm Crag about 1½ miles north-west of Grasmere.


Grasmere (the lake) becomes visible as we head west from Rydal Cave towards Loughrigg Terrace.


Stunning views of Grasmere and the surrounding mountains as we walk along Loughrigg Terrace.

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As we make our way along the road to Loughrigg Tarn, there is a view of Harrison Stickle, Thorn Crag and Loft Crag.


Alternating areas of farmland are bathed in sunshine as we look south from the track beneath Loughrigg Fell’s Ivy Crag.


Bridge House, Ambleside

Bridge House is possibly the most photographed building in the Lake District, and a popular subject for many artists including Turner. A tiny building, originally an apple store for nearby Ambleside Hall, was built over Stock Beck to escape land tax. Once five mills were driven by the power of Stock Beck and some can still be seen nearby. It is said that at some time a family with six children lived here in the two rooms.

In 1926 it was purchased by a group of local people who passed it into the care of the National Trust, which 20 years later they turned into their first information and recruitment centre.

Information from https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/bridge-house


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