Appleby-in-Westmorland and High Cup Nick

North-east from Appleby-in-Westmorland on A Pennine Journey through Flakebridge Wood, then north-west to the village of Dufton. Joining the Pennine Way, it’s east all the way to High Cup Nick, followed by a U-turn to head across Middle Tongue to Harbour Flatt. Finally south-west to Brackenthwaite and Flakebridge Wood, returning to Appleby-in-Westmorland via Stank Lane. A 14-mile walk in the North Pennines.


The River Eden in Appleby-in-Westmorland.


Walking along A Pennine Journey through Flakebridge Wood.


A magical purple carpet of flowering bluebells in Flakebridge Wood.


The view east from the Pennine Way just outside Dufton. High Cup Gill is behind the hills.


The start of the 3-mile Pennine Way ascent to High Cup Nick.


The track heading south between the hills of Gregory (left) and Harthwaite (right) towards Keisley Bank.


Looking back towards Appleby-in Westmorland from the Pennine Way near Dod Hill.


Our first sighting of the High Cup Gill valley.


Lunch by the side of Narrow Gate, the path above the northern slopes of High Cup Gill.


Strands Beck topples over the edge and flows into High Cupgill Beck 200 metres below.


A rocky section of the Pennine Way path. The hills of the Yorkshire Dales are on the horizon.


High Cup Nick, at the head of the valley, becomes visible from the Pennine Way. The rocky outcrop is High Cup Scar.


Looking south-west down the valley towards Appleby-in Westmorland and the hills of the Yorkshire Dales.


The dramatic steep-sided slopes on the southern side of High Cup Gill.


Angy stops to take a photograph of this amazing place.


High Cup Nick at the top of the valley.


Time for a sit down and a chance to soak up the atmosphere and embrace the fantastic views.


A warm clear day and an opportunity to relax and enjoy the scenery.


High Cupgill Beck meanders through the valley and joins other streams which flow into the River Eden.


Looking back at High Cup Nick from the path above the southern slopes of the valley.


The view of Trundale Gill from the flanks of Middle Tongue.


Farmland around Low Barn, south of Flakebridge Wood.


Dead moles hanging on barbed wire. Some mole-catchers say it is a tradition which allows farmers to be sure they pay for the right number of moles caught.